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Planning Board to Meet on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:30 p.m.

8th July 2016

The Duck Planning Board Council will hold its regular meeting on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. in the Paul F. Keller Meeting Hall at 1200 Duck Road.   The public is welcome and all interested parties are encouraged to attend.  For the agenda click here, or visit the Planning Board page to view the agenda […]

The post Planning Board to Meet on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. appeared first on Town of Duck, North Carolina.

Updated Flood Maps Available

8th July 2016

Area residents, property owners and businesses can see how their property is classified by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) when the N.C. Flood Risk Information System releases the first version of new coastal floodplain maps for Dare County. The preliminary maps may be viewed online at http://fris.nc.gov/fris/. The maps are also accessible along with […]

The post Updated Flood Maps Available appeared first on Town of Duck, North Carolina.

Surviving the “Black March” Article from this months Albemarle Tradewinds Magazine

8th July 2016
Surviving the “Black March”

By: David Bennett (Curator of the Port o’ Plymouth Museum)

In early 1944, two Washington County men, Benjamin Jackson and Benjamin Robertson,
members of the U.S. Eighth Air Force, were shot down over Germany. Despite coming from the
same community, the two men were complete strangers, but a chance meeting in a German
prisoner of war camp forever changed their lives.

Both men found themselves imprisoned at Stalag Luft IV, a German POW camp that was
overcrowded, lacked bathing facilities, and subjected its prisoners to physical abuse. It was in
this environment that Jackson and Robertson first met. The two men were introduced by a
mutual friend, Woodrow Collins, another aviator from Washington County.

In February 1945, the Russians were closing in on the camp. The Germans responded by
evacuating and forcing over 8,000 prisoners to march more than 500 miles in the dead of winter.
Today, the journey is known as the “Black March.” During the march about a quarter of the men
died of starvation, disease, exposure, and physical abuse. The ones who survived the ordeal
made it due to the buddy system. Jackson and Robertson paired up during the march and helped
one another find food during the day and stay warm at night. During the march Robertson
became severely ill and his tonsils rotted out. Eventually he became so weak that he could no
longer walk. In an effort to save Robertson, Jackson put him on a horse drawn wagon. At some
point along the march, the group was split up and Jackson and Robertson became separated. By
the time Robertson was liberated, he had lost 65 pounds.
It was not until much later that the two men were reunited after the war. It is difficult to say
what would have happened had the two never met, but it is safe to say that the bond they formed
during captivity contributed to their survival.


 Jackson
Robertson

A timely article from Joe Forbes in this months Albemarle Tradewinds Magazine

7th July 2016
 
Far more people get into trouble over having a concealed weapon when they interact with a law-enforcement officer than they do actually using the weapon. Please take a few minutes to refresh your understanding of the laws and avoid trouble.

NCGS 14-269 states that it is unlawful to "carry concealed about his or her person" any weapon, etc. while not on their own premises. There are two elements of the offense to be concerned about: Concealed and About The Person. "Concealed" means hidden or not readily discernible from sight. The courts have looked to the intent of the law, which is to protect law enforcement officers, in determining what constitutes "About" your person, and the general consensus is that the weapon must be within easy reach of the concealer, so that it could possibly be used against an unsuspecting officer. A weapon under the front seat of a car is within easy reach of the driver, and is therefore illegal, but one in the trunk is not. 

The problem usually arises in the gray areas. A concealed gun in the back cargo area of a station wagon/SUV is clearly not "about" the person of the driver, but it is within easy reach of a back seat passenger. A pistol jammed between the front seat and the console will usually get the driver charged with violating the law, despite the fact that exactly as much of the gun is showing as it would be if carried openly in a belt holster. The State's argument in that case is always that the officer can see the whole hip holster as the carrier walks down the street, so the presence of a weapon is open and obvious, but not so when looking into a car. The general rule for whether a weapon is "concealed" within a vehicle is whether an officer walking up and looking into the car can readily see it.

The law provides an exception for people possessing a handgun under a valid concealed carry permit as long as the carrier operates within the constraints of the law. You can't carry in a courthouse, or government buildings in general. You can't carry with ANY alcohol or non-prescription controlled drugs in your system. If you are going out to have even a glass of wine with dinner, be safe and lock it in the trunk of your car until you get home.

NCGS 14-415.11 provides that when when you are carrying, and when approached or addressed by a law enforcement officer, you must tell the officer that you have the weapon. Use common sense here. If you have a weapon in your vehicle and you are standing outside 20 feet away, then the law does not require you to mention the weapon. (Depending on the circumstances, it may be a good idea to mention it, but you are not required to.) But if you have to go into the vehicle while the officer is there, such as to retrieve your drivers license, then tell the officer about the presence of the weapon, especially if you have to go near it. 

(It should be stressed that, although it may be legal to carry the weapon in another state under the reciprocity provisions between the states, the other state's laws regarding prohibited places and practices may not be the same as ours. The most common example of this is that some states forbid concealed weapons on any premises where alcohol is served, regardless of whether the carrier is drinking. When in doubt, don't do it.)

When talking to the officer, keep both hands where they can be seen. Tell the officer where the weapon is, but don't reach for it. Tell him you have a permit, but don't reach for it unless instructed to. Remember, it's all about making sure the officer knows you are being forthcoming about the weapon, and that you have no intention of using it against him. You carry the weapon to prevent harm to yourself. All the officer wants out of the encounter is the same thing.

Smithfield among top water polluters in state, country

7th July 2016

Raleigh, NC – Smithfield Foods, which claims to be the world’s largest pork producer, dumps more toxic pollution into state waters than any other agribusiness, and produces the third most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today.

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

7th July 2016

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. 

Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

Yard of the Season

6th July 2016

Crowded creek

6th July 2016

Honoring retirees

6th July 2016

Video: “Sexy Crazy Kiter” – EPIC Kites

5th July 2016

Outer Banks Local and EPIC Kites owner Dimitri Maramenides is at it again. This video is packed full of “crazy”... Read More

The post Video: “Sexy Crazy Kiter” – EPIC Kites appeared first on OBX Surf Info.

July 2016 Version of the Albemarle Tradewinds is now online

4th July 2016
https://issuu.com/crabber
Look for the printed edition to be at your favorite location 
Starting July 6th

OBX Summer Fun Waves – Dr. Jeff Hanson

3rd July 2016

Wave Man’s Notebook – July 1, 2016 I have been riding my bike to the beach lately. This morning I... Read More

The post OBX Summer Fun Waves – Dr. Jeff Hanson appeared first on OBX Surf Info.

4th of July Week Trash and Recycle Schedule

1st July 2016

In observance of the 4th of July holiday next week Trash collection will take place on Tuesday, July 5th and Saturday, July 9th. Recycling collection will remain the same and take place on Monday, July 4th.

The post 4th of July Week Trash and Recycle Schedule appeared first on Town of Duck, North Carolina.

Town Council to Meet on Wednesday, July 6, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.

1st July 2016

The Duck Town Council will hold its regular meeting on Wednesday, July 6, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. in the Paul F. Keller Meeting Hall at 1200 Duck Road.   The public is welcome and all interested parties are encouraged to attend.  For the agenda click here, or visit the Town Council page to view the agenda […]

The post Town Council to Meet on Wednesday, July 6, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. appeared first on Town of Duck, North Carolina.